Shakespeare & Co Books

We buy, sell, and trade used and rare books.

Come visit us at
2499 Telegraph Ave
Berkeley, CA.94704

510-841-8916

every book lover’s nightmare. 
(found this on reddit: r/abandonedporn) 
I have SUCH an artistic crush on Monique Lallier!

Lost Type Co-Op: Awesome "pay-what-you-want" Type Foundry

Lord knows, we love our funky fonts here at Shakespeare and Co. I feel like I’m constantly searching for a cool new font to use in our next display. A friend sent this to me - and I can’t help but pass the word along!

vintageanchor:

“Books seem so much more, much more sacred to me, and more important and essential, than they were when I was young…great books are organic works. They don’t die. They’re not frozen in any way. They’re absolutely alive, and more so as we get older.” ―Jhumpa Lahiri, Unaccustomed Earth

vintageanchor:

“Books seem so much more, much more sacred to me, and more important and essential, than they were when I was young…great books are organic works. They don’t die. They’re not frozen in any way. They’re absolutely alive, and more so as we get older.”
―Jhumpa Lahiri, Unaccustomed Earth

(Source: vintageanchorbooks)

theatlantic:

With This Machine, You Can Print Your Own Books at the Local Bookstore

I’ve been intrigued by the Espresso Book Machine since I first saw it in an oversized beta version in 2007 on display at the New York Public Library’s Science Industry and Business branch and was impressed with the notion that so many printed works could be brought to life instantly, complete with cover, spine, and a choice of interiors. But the greatest allure of the device, as explained in interviews with a handful of the booksellers who have taken the plunge and installed the machine, is that it enables self-publishing by authors who have written fiction and specialized nonfiction (recipes and family genealogy, for example) and are satisfied with a small number of copies, at least initially.
Read more. [Image: Politics and Prose/Flickr]

theatlantic:

With This Machine, You Can Print Your Own Books at the Local Bookstore

I’ve been intrigued by the Espresso Book Machine since I first saw it in an oversized beta version in 2007 on display at the New York Public Library’s Science Industry and Business branch and was impressed with the notion that so many printed works could be brought to life instantly, complete with cover, spine, and a choice of interiors. But the greatest allure of the device, as explained in interviews with a handful of the booksellers who have taken the plunge and installed the machine, is that it enables self-publishing by authors who have written fiction and specialized nonfiction (recipes and family genealogy, for example) and are satisfied with a small number of copies, at least initially.

Read more. [Image: Politics and Prose/Flickr]

teachingliteracy:

mykalbloom

love this!!

teachingliteracy:

mykalbloom

love this!!

(Source: michaelrxs)

<3

<3

“Berkeley ‎ - Nov 18, 2011
Ever since the new manager has taken over the store has become a great bookstore and a great addition to Telegraph Avenue. The selection of books is excellent, the prices are reasonable, and the staff are exceedingly helpful. There is a feeling now that transports you to the past when independent bookstores proliferated, as if you were in the original Shakespeare’s in Paris hobnobbing with Hemingway and Joyce. The staff also have a real expertise in choosing used books.”

—   This is a review that Jon, the owner of our store, found on Google Maps this week. This year, we’ve been working so hard to renovate and refresh the store, without changing the lovely, old-fashioned used bookstore feel. Jon and Stephanie have been buying nicer quality books and sorting and repricing old ones; I’ve been working on creating appealing displays and bookmarks; Daniel and Kevin have been invaluable in so many ways - from shelving to entirely reworking sections. It’s been a huge labor of love for all of us, so positive responses really help to keep our spirits up! 

czarmonger asked: One of the best window displays I've ever seen!

thanks so much!

The Art of Journal Keeping

A customer came into the store yesterday looking for books on illuminated manuscripts, typography and bookmaking. This subject being a favorite of mine, I showed her five sections in the store she might like: medieval art, books on books, calligraphy, typography and medieval studies. After awhile, she came up to the counter with a few books in hand - including her own sketchbook, which was one of the most beautiful journals I’ve ever seen. She let me flip through it - each page was carefully illustrated and colored, with tiny descriptions in her beautiful handwriting. It was a diary to be certain - every page described what she’d done that day - with lovely sketches of people and buildings and ideas. It’s not often that I’m rendered absolutely speechless with envy.

Above: The journals of Joann Sfar (not the customer from yesterday).

The New Yorker: Takes: Happy 85th Birthday, Gabriel García Márquez

That was how the first of seven boys and four girls was born in Aracataca on March 6, 1927, in an unseasonable torrential downpour, while the sky of Taurus rose on the horizon. I was almost strangled by the umbilical cord, because the family midwife, Santos Villero, lost her mastery of her art…

(Source: newyorker.com)

This isn&#8217;t a picture of our store. But we do have a similar feel.

The Atlantic says The Help softens segregation

In a tough review of the film based on Kathryn Stockett’s The Help, the Atlantic's Alyssa Rosenberg writes that the book exchanges the harsh realities of segregation for a feel-good narrative about a progressive white woman.

Have any of you read the book? Do you agree? Disagree?

Read the review here.

robot-heart:

#8 (by Paul Octavious)